Pet Health Articles

Care & Wellness

  • There are many potential hazards for cats who go or live outdoors compared to indoor cats. Fenced yards do not protect cats nor keep them contained to the yard. Other cats and wildlife can enter the yard and cause damage through fighting or attack. Although vaccines can be effective at preventing disease, there are many infections your cat can acquire outdoors that cannot be prevented, including FIV from cat bites, intestinal parasites, fleas, ticks and even lice. Cats can also be exposed to toxins through contact or ingesting poisoned rodents. They can be hit by cars or injured by humans who do not appreciate them. If you feel your cat must go outdoors, train them to wear a leash and harness and/or create a safe outdoor cat enclosure and monitor them at all times they are outdoors.

  • Periodontal disease is the most common problem affecting cats of all age groups. The importance of daily dental home care cannot be overemphasized. Nutrition can contribute to preventing periodontal disease and gingivitis.

  • Online shopping for convenience and great prices has quickly become the new normal in today's consumerism society. Although technology may help us be savvy shoppers, it's still good to be cautious about what you purchase online, especially when it comes to your pet's medications.

  • A cesarean section is a surgery to remove kittens from the uterus and is most commonly performed as an emergency procedure when there is difficulty with natural birth. During the immediate recovery period, the mother and kittens must be closely monitored and begin eating/nursing within a few hours. If you have any concerns about their health, you should immediately have your veterinarian examine the kittens and their mother.

  • Cheyletiellosis in rabbits is a condition caused by the common rabbit mite, Cheyletiella parasitovorax. This mite’s effects are sometimes called "walking dandruff" because they are large, whitish mites that crawl across the skin and hair of a rabbit and cause excessive flaky skin. Other clinical signs of cheyletiellosis include itching, scratching, and hair/fur loss. This species of mites can live in the environment for a short time and affect people and other animals, so it is important to follow your veterinarian's recommendations for treating the environment and all pets in the household.

  • Chin acne in cats is a poorly understood disorder of follicular keratinization (the overproduction of keratin, a protein found in the outer layer of skin). If this excess keratin is trapped in the hair follicle, comedones (blackheads) form. Pustules (pimples) may form if bacteria infect the comedones. The underlying causes are not fully understood but may be associated with excess sebum production, viral infection, immunosuppression, stress, or poor grooming. Treatment options are available and often involve improved hygiene.

  • This handout provides basic guidelines for feeding a pet chinchilla a healthy and balanced diet tailored to the specific needs of chinchillas.

  • Chinchillas can make fun, enjoyable pets. They can live 15-20 years, so the family must plan for a long-term commitment. They require a cage with a wheel to run in to help them maintain their health and strength. Yearly veterinary examinations are highly advised as they are very good at hiding symptoms of illness.

  • Chinchillas are generally hardy animals but can have several unique problems; understanding them will help you care for your pet and manage potential health problems.

  • The cage should allow the chinchilla to move around a lot, as they are very active, agile, and acrobatic animals. Multilevel cages, similar to those designed for ferrets, work well, as long as there are no areas where a chinchilla could get its limbs or feet caught. Most owners house one or two pets in a cage; often the two pets are mates. Chinchillas require a dust bath for normal grooming. Cages should be emptied and cleaned at least weekly with soap and water.