Pet Health Articles

Puppies

  • Canine herpesvirus, or canine herpes, is a systemic, often fatal disease of puppies caused by the canine herpes virus. It may remain latent in tissues after a dog is infected and may be passed on to other dogs, particularly to fetuses developing in the mother's uterus. Clinical signs in puppies include difficulty breathing, nasal discharge, anorexia, soft stools, crying, seizures, and sudden death. Symptoms in adult dogs include coughing and sneezing, miscarriage, lesions on the external genitalia, conjunctivitis, and corneal ulcers. The disease may be prevented by avoiding contact with infected dogs. Pregnant dogs should be isolated to prevent infection.

  • Hookworm is a parasitic infection of the gastrointestinal tract of dogs. Their name is derived from the hook-like mouthparts they use to anchor themselves to the lining of the intestinal wall. How the infection is spread along with clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are covered in this handout.

  • By using positive reinforcement, consistency, and good supervision it is simple to housetrain most dogs. Start housetraining right away, or even before you bring home a new puppy or dog. Most puppies will pause activity, sniff, and sometimes circle before squatting or posturing to eliminate. Other puppies may act generally restless and agitated when they have a full bladder or bowel. Watch closely for these signs, so you can help your puppy be successful. The goals of housetraining are to have your dog eliminate in the right areas, eliminate immediately when asked, communicate the need to eliminate, eliminate on or off leash, and when you are near a person, and hold bladder and bowels when inside/not in the elimination area. This handout describes easy to follow instructions to help housetrain your puppy. If your previously well housetrained dog begins making mistakes, always consult your veterinarian for guidance.

  • Hydrocephalus is an excess of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that has leaked inside the skull, leading to brain swelling. There are two main types of hydrocephalus in dogs: congenital and acquired. Small, miniature, and toy breeds seem to be more affected. In the acute or early phases of hydrocephalus, treatment is directed toward reducing CSF production and inflammation. For acquired hydrocephalus, therapy is focused on treating the underlying cause and may range from medications to surgery to radiation therapy. Your veterinarian will discuss your pet’s prognosis and treatment options based on its individual condition.

  • Infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) is a viral infection caused by a member of the adenovirus family. Young dogs are at the highest risk of contracting this virus and signs of disease usually occur within two to five days after exposure. In severe cases, usually in young puppies, along with the fever, depression, and loss of appetite, there is abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, edema (fluid swelling under the skin) of the head and neck, and possibly jaundice. Such cases are often fatal. Treatment is aimed at reducing symptoms and giving time for the dog's immune system to respond, including hospitalization, intravenous fluids, and medications. Vaccination has been very successful at reducing the prevalence of this disease.

  • This handout outlines internal parasites in dogs. Included are parasites of the gastrointestinal tract (roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, and tapeworms), as well as parasites of the circulatory system (heartworm). How each of these parasites can affect your dog and what you can do to prevent or treat infection are all explained.

  • This handout explains juvenile cellulitis (also called Puppy Strangles) in puppies. Characterized by a sudden swelling of the face and muzzle, it can be confused with an allergic reaction or skin infection. The clinical signs are discussed, as well as diagnostic and treatment recommendations to resolve the condition should it occur.

  • Juvenile hyperparathyroidism is a rare, inherited condition of German Shepherds and leads to a constant state of elevated parathyroid hormone, affecting calcium and phosphorus balance within the body. It is an inherited, autosomal recessive trait that causes stunted growth. Removal of anywhere from one to three of the parathyroid glands is performed to bring the calcium levels into a more normal range.

  • Lysosomal storage diseases are a rare collection of conditions that are inherited. Many of them are more prevalent in certain breeds and are seen in the first few months of life. Clinical signs vary depending on the type of disease, but commonly include failure to thrive, incoordination, vision loss, and seizure. Prognosis is usually poor for long-term survival.

  • Mastitis is a term used to describe inflammation of a mammary gland. In most cases, mastitis is caused by a bacterial infection. Trauma to the mammary gland, or prolonged periods of milk accumulation without milk removal, can lead to inflammation within the mammary gland. Most dogs with mastitis can be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics and pain medications, though severe cases may require hospitalization or surgery.